[Term] 음절 (syllable)


Vowels and consonants consists a syllable and each syllable must have at least one vowel. The letter forms are as follows; ① vowel ② vowel + consonant, ③ consonant + vowel, ④ consonant + vowel + consonant. (cf. We don't count 'ㅇ' as a vowel when it comes at the first part of a letter.)


① (O) + 'ㅑ' = '' , (O) + 'ㅗ' = '', ② '' , '', ③ '', '', ④ '', ''



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[Final-ending] ~세요/으세요 (please)

"~세요/으세요" is used when we ask somebody to do something. The subject is "you" (the listener) and is usually omitted. When the verb stem ends in a consonant, we add "~세요/~으세요". When …

Kmaru 5
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[Final-ending] ~ㄹ까요/으까요 (How about ~ing)

"~ㄹ까요/으까요" is used to suggest something in spoken Korean. Since your suggestion is not directly spoken in your question with "~ㄹ까요/으까요", it could sound politer than "~ㅂ시다…

Kmaru
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[Final-ending] ~ㅂ시다/으시다 (Let's)

"~ㅂ시다/으시다" is used when we suggest something to the listener, usually politely or in a formal situation. When the verb stem ends in a consonant, we add "~읍시다". When the verb stem end…

Kmaru 12
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[Final-ending] – (스)ㅂ니까? (do)

When we use "(스)ㅂ니다" in a formal context, we use "–(스)ㅂ니까?" to ask a question. "그는 아침을 먹습니다/He has breakfast" is changed to "아침을 먹습니까?/Does he have…

Kmaru 6
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[Final-ending] ~ (스)ㅂ니다 (do)

the basic form of korean verbs and adjectives are "~다". We change "~다" into "~(스)ㅂ니다" in formal situation, such as in a meeting, presentation, interview, newscast, etc. When the "stem(어…

Kmaru 7
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[Conjunctive-adverb] 그런데 (but/however)

We use "그런데" when the latter sentence is still related to the former but you want to change the subject. "저는 내일 등산을 가기로 했습니다. 그런데 일기예보에서는 내일 …

Kmaru 9
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[Conjunctive-adverb] 그래서 (so)

We use "그래서" to connect two sentences with cause-and-effect relationship. "그는 우산을 안 가져갔다. 그래서 비에 다 젖었다." is "He didn't take his umbrella. So he got wet in …

Kmaru 2
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[Conjunctive-adverb] 그러나/하지만 (but/however)

We use "그러나" and "하지만" when we suggest new information that is contrary to what is suggested before. They are both used in written Korean, but 하지만 is used more frequently in conversa…

Kmaru 2
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[Conjunctive-adverb] 그리고 (and)

We use "그리고" to connect two sentences. It means that you want to add more information to the first sentence in a similar context. Also, we use "그리고" to show the time order of two or more e…

Kmaru 2
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[Auxiliary-predicate] ~아/어/여야 하다/되다 (be)

"~아/어/여야 하다/되다" means must/have to/should/ought to be. Note that you have to use "돼요", not "되요" in your writing. It is a common mistake even among native Koreans. "집에 가…

Kmaru 3
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[Auxiliary-predicate] ~아/어/여 보다 (have ~ed)

"~아/어/여 보다" is used to express the previous experience. Because the we are talking about the past, we use "보다" in past tense, such as "봤다", "봤어요", "봤습니다", etc. "한국…

Kmaru 3
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[Auxiliary-predicate] 아/어/여 보다 (try ~ing)

"~아/어/여 보다" means to try (verb) + ~ing. When it is used in "보세요/보십시오" form, it means to suggest doing something to the listener. "한국 음식을 먹어 보다." is "Try Kore…

Kmaru
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[Auxiliary-predicate] ~고 싶다 (want to)

We use "~고 싶다" to express the speaker's wish to do something. When "I" is the subject, it is usually omitted. When it is used in a question, the omitted subject is usually "you". "더 자고 …

Kmaru 7
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[Auxiliary-predicate] ~고 있다 (wear/take)

"~고 있다" sometimes indicates the result of an action, rather than its progress. This usually happens with verbs such as "입다", "신다", "쓰다", "끼다", which usually mean "wear", "put (on…

Kmaru
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[Auxiliary-predicate] ~고 있다 (be ~ing)

"~고 있다" indicates that the action is in progress. "가고 있어요." is "I am going.", "텔레비전 보고 있어요." is "I am watching TV."

Kmaru

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